The Art of Working with Anxious, Antagonistic Adolescents

Ways Forward for Frontline Professionals

This is a series of surprising and candid conversations held between veteran counsellor Nick Luxmoore and professionals working with young people. Based entirely on stories from the author's experience of supervising frontline professionals, it looks at how to approach young people, the stumbling blocks faced on both sides, and offers invaluable guidance to anyone working with teenagers.

Luxmoore posits ways forward for practitioners which are adaptive and allow them to respond personally, practically and theoretically. From suicide to disordered eating, watching pornography to love in therapeutic relationships, Nick Luxmoore covers a range of problems and phenomena encountered by counsellors, teachers, school social workers and youth workers. One chapter sees a counsellor struggling for questions to ask a boy whose father abandoned his family only to return two years later, another a teacher finding it impossible to know how to speak to a fourteen-year-old with an inoperable brain tumour.

Recounted in a style that motivates, engages and inspires, The Art of Working with Anxious, Antagonistic Adolescents allows professionals to gain a better understanding of their capacity, particularly developmentally and pastorally, and not reach for easy answers or a quick fix. These are lessons in the art of working with today's teenagers.

£15.99
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Press reviews for: The Art of Working with Anxious, Antagonistic Adolescents

Anthea Millar, Cambridge Supervision Training and co-author of Practical Supervision: How to become a Supervisor for the Helping Professions

Nick is a consummate storyteller and much more. Woven within the vividly narrated supervisory encounters are rich learning points drawn from his years of skilled experience and deep theoretical knowledge. Identifying therapeutic tasks, and addressing sex, death and hatred are just some of the invaluable issues explored. An essential read for all professionals working with young people.

Dr Caryn Onions, Child and Adolescent Psychotherapist and Head of Research and Development at the Mulberry Bush

Using the lens of the supervisory relationship Nick Luxmoore examines the turbulent emotional world of young people. Nick's wealth of experience is evident as he shares his thoughts about what helps and what hinders therapeutic relationships. Given the current focus on mental health in schools this will be a timely read for all hard-pressed professionals.

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