A House for Everyone

A Story to Help Children Learn about Gender Identity and Gender Expression

Author
Illustrator

At lunchtime, all of Tom's friends gather at school to work together building their house. Each one of them has a special job to do, and each one of them has a different way of expressing their gender identity.

Jackson is a boy who likes to wear dresses. Ivy is a girl who likes her hair cut really short. Alex doesn't feel like 'just' a boy, or 'just' a girl. They are all the same, they are all different - but they are all friends.

A very simple story that challenges gender stereotypes and shows 4 to 8 year olds that it is OK to be yourself. An engaging story that is more than just an educational tool; this book will assist parents and teachers in giving children the space to explore the full spectrum of gender diversity and will show children the many ways they can express their gender in a truly positive light.

£10.99
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Press reviews for: A House for Everyone

Diane Ehrensaft, Ph.D. Author of The Gender Creative Child and Gender Born, Gender Made, Director of Mental Health of the Child and Adolescent Gender Center

In this era of gender revolution, A House for Everyone reminds us that gender isn't two boxes but a rainbow with room for children of every gender. Jo Hirst's brilliant book teaches all our children about gender identity and gender expressions while celebrating gender acceptance--let's bring it to every classroom and household.

Rebecca Seymour, Little Parachutes

A vibrant, up-beat story about inclusion and acceptance, looking past stereotypes and embracing human differences. It's a much-needed resource in the Gender Identity category.

Sarah McBride, author of Tomorrow Will Be Different

A poignant, powerful, and needed addition to our homes, schools and libraries. Through its diverse characters and message of inclusion, A House for Everyone helps to open hearts, change minds, and build a world where no child is limited in their expression and potential.

Lucy Thomas, co- founder/ co-CEO, Project Rockit

I am so glad that this book exists. A House for Everyone provides an example of what children's literature can achieve as literally a house for every child to feel seen and represented as they explore the wider world with wonder and imagination. As five kids team up to build their ultimate play house, we learn that when people's differences are celebrated, wonderful things can happen.

Associate Professor Damien W. Riggs, Flinders University, author (with Clare Bartholomaeus) of Transgender People and Education (Palgrave, 2017)

Hirst has hit it out of the park again. Her first book, The Gender Fairy, introduced readers to an understanding of gender diversity that moved beyond standard tropes of transgender people's lives. Her second book, A House for Everyone, takes this a step further by introducing readers to a group of young characters diverse in their genders, but united by a shared project. The diversity of characters explored by Hirst takes the 'transgender tipping point' beyond binary lives, exploring also lives lived beyond the gender binary. For this Hirst is to be thoroughly congratulated, and this book commended.

Ursula Benstead, Psychologist, Creator of The Shark Cage: A Human Rights Approach to Gender Violence

A House for Everyone is a much needed book, so vital in developing mindsets of flexibility, acceptance and inclusion around gender in our next generation of adults and potential world leaders. This is the kind of preventative tool we need to combat bullying and exclusion towards young people who depart from traditional, rigid and harmful ideas about gender and it's expression. Jo Hirst manages to convey so much in her delightful and engaging story of children building something together. If this publication was used in all schools and homes, perhaps more children could grow up to build a world of inclusion and equality.

Susie Green, CEO Mermaids UK

It is refreshing to see all aspects of gender identity not only represented but celebrated in this charming, warm story. In a fast changing and binary world, this reminds us that the basis for happiness is being allowed to be who you really are, and this book delivers that message without preaching or dictating. I would like to see this in the library of all schools, reinforcing that gender is not as simple as boys and girls, and that acknowledging and respecting this does not harm any of us, as members of the human race.

Healthy Books

The bright pictures are fun, and this will be a good way to teach gender differences as well as the fact that we are all disparate but can work and live together happily.

Raise Them Righteous

This is one of the most inclusive picture books about gender identity and expression I have come across and I highly recommend it for school and personal libraries. This can easily be read with children three and up. The author provides a practical resource guide including definitions and discussion prompts for parents and teachers not familiar with terminology introduced. Highly recommended.

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